Your pelvic floor

Men

1 in 10 men will suffer from bladder weakness

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Bladder weakness often occurs after prostate surgery and can be one of the biggest challenges to overcome during the recovery process.

Many men suffer from urinary incontinence 

It can be incredibly embarrassing and too often suffered in silence but bladder weakness or incontinence in men is also fairly common effecting 1 in 10 men2. Generally experienced by men following prostate surgery, it can be one of the biggest challenges to overcome during the recovery process.

The prostate gland is a male reproductive organ about the size of a walnut and sits at the base of the bladder. The urethra that carries urine and semen out of the penis runs through the centre of this prostate gland. At the point where the bladder and urethra join, there is a ring of muscles known as the bladder neck sphincter, which opens and closes like a camera-shutter. The bladder neck sphincter is closed most of the time to prevent urine leaking out, but when it gets a signal from the brain, it opens to allow urine to be passed. A further (external) sphincter which is part of another set of muscles below the prostate, is the pelvic floor. These muscles are also involved in the function of bladder control. If the bladder neck sphincter is damaged during prostate cancer surgery, extra pressure is placed on the pelvic floor and if this is not strong enough it can lead to urinary incontinence.

Leaks usually occur when you undertake activities that increase the pressure inside the abdomen, and push down on the bladder. If the pelvic floor muscles are not strong, urine will leak out. This is known as 'stress incontinence' and can have a significant impact on your life, causing embarrassment and knocking your confidence. Typical activities that can result in leaks are coughing, sneezing, shouting, laughing, lifting, walking, bending, pushing, pulling and moving from lying to sitting or sitting to standing positions. All everyday occurrences that are hard to avoid if trying to maintain a normal and active lifestyle.

Incontinence can improve with time, but only by learning how to control the pelvic floor muscles can you speed up the recovery process and reduce the urinary leaks. If you don't strengthen these muscles, the urinary leaks may persist.

Innovotherapy can significantly treat incontinence for men by strengthening the pelvic floor. By following the programme using the INNOVO® device, men can notice a difference in as little as four weeks allowing you to get back to your daily routine with peace of mind.1

Innovotherapy can significantly treat incontinence for men by strengthening the pelvic floor.

Bladder weakness often occurs after prostate surgery and can be one of the biggest challenges to overcome during the recovery process.

1 in 10 Men suffer with Bladder Weakness in the UK.

Overcome leaks with INNOVO® today.

Related articles

1) Soeder S, Tunn R. (2012) - Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) of the Pelvic Floor Muscles using a Non-Invasive Surface Device in the Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI); A Pilot Study. IUGA Poster Presentation Conference, Dublin, Ireland (2013)

2) Continence Foundation of Australia, Key statistics http://www.continence.org.au/pages/key-statistics.html